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Bay State Wind opens downtown New Bedford office

From SouthCoastToday.com

NEW BEDFORD — Bay State Wind officially cut the ribbon on a downtown office Thursday, joining two others in a show of confidence that New Bedford will become the hub of the wind energy business in Massachusetts.

Bay State Wind is a partnership with the Danish energy firm Ørsted, formerly Danish Oil and Natural Gas, or DONG, and Eversource. The office is at 628 Pleasant St.

Ørsted North American president, Thomas Brostrom, said that the company has gone out of the oil and gas business and is now 100 percent clean energy.

They will now enter the competition for a state-guaranteed market for 2,000 megawatts of wind power to be delivered to Massachusetts customers. The others are Vineyard Wind and Deepwater Wind, which also have offices in the city.

Bay State Wind officials announced that the firm is making a $25,000 gift to the New Bedford Wind Energy Center. That brought applause from the about 30 attendees, politicians, business leaders and wind energy players.

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Bay State Wind opens doors in New Bedford

Thomas Brostrom of DONG Energy, left, and Ken Bowes, right, of Eversource join New Bedford Mayor Jon Mitchell at Thursday’s opening of Bay State Wind’s offices across from City Hall.

NEW BEDFORD — Bay State Wind, one of three developers competing to build the first industrial-scale offshore wind farm off the Massachusetts coast, has opened offices on Pleasant Street.

“New Bedford is going to be the epicenter for offshore wind in Massachusetts,” said Thomas Brostrom of Bay State Wind and its parent company, DONG Energy (which is being re-named Orsted). “It has been teed up for a long time” he told a group of about three dozen elected officials, education and business leaders, and representatives from local community groups who attended Thursday’s opening.

Bay State Wind is a partnership between the international renewable energy leader DONG Energy of Denmark and Eversource, New England’s largest utility, which is also transitioning from fossil fuels to green energy sources.

Brostrom said Bay State Wind will contribute $25,000 to the New Bedford Wind Energy Center, which is leading the city’s efforts to promote the growth of the offshore wind industry and associated economic development within the Port of New Bedford. Brostrom said Bay State Wind looks forward to being a permanent part of New Bedford and its success.

Eversource Vice President Ken Bowes joined Brostrom in making the announcement at the new offices at 628 Pleasant St., across from City Hall.

“I think we picked a great partner,” he said.

New Bedford Mayor Jon Mitchell said he wants New Bedford to serve as the hub of the offshore wind industry as it does to commercial fishing. The Port of New Bedford is the national leader not only in the value of the seafood landed there, but also in the marine services that support commercial fishing. Mitchell acknowledged that as the industry expands, other port cities will also gain.

However, he said, “we want to be the first among equals.”

Bay State Wind joins Deepwater Wind and Vineyard Wind with offices in the city. Bids to develop the first project in a decade-long, 1,600MW initiative are expected to be awarded in the spring.

Paul Vigeant, managing director of the New Bedford Wind Energy Center, thanked state Reps. Tony Cabral and Paul Schmid, who attended the opening ceremonies, for their aid in making Massachusetts a national leader in the new industry. But, he said, there are 10GW of electrical power potential just off the Massachusetts coast and he challenged the Legislature to help the industry build 3,000 MW by 2030.

Vineyard Wind Bolsters Team with Offshore Wind Industry Leaders

From BusinessWire

NEW BEDFORD –Vineyard Wind, an offshore wind energy developer vying to build the first utility-scale project off the coast of Massachusetts, is transitioning its organization to prepare for the construction phase of its project, naming longtime offshore wind industry expert Lars Thaaning Pedersen as its new CEO and Iain Henderson as its CFO.

“As we grow our team in Massachusetts, we have assembled some of the best people in the offshore wind industry to advance our effort”

Erich Stephens, who has led development of the project since 2014, will become Vineyard Wind’s Chief Development Officer, and will continue his work focusing on the pre-construction development of the project.

The executive team additions were part of a long-planned evolution by project owners Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners (CIP) and Avangrid Renewables aimed at bolstering the team with industry experts with a long track record of successfully constructing and operating projects in Europe.

“As we grow our team in Massachusetts, we have assembled some of the best people in the offshore wind industry to advance our effort,” said Pedersen. “With Erich’s unrivalled experience developing offshore wind in the US, leading the Vineyard Wind project from its inception, and the addition of Iain to our team, we believe we will be able to soon deliver the best possible offshore wind project for Massachusetts. We’re looking forward to building the offshore wind industry here in New England and I am excited to be a part of the team.

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US could see 3GW of offshore wind power by 2017

From reNEWS

Offshore wind is chomping at the bit in the US, with states jockeying to capture manufacturing jobs while developers are chasing leases and offtake deals, delegates heard at the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) Offshore Windpower conference in New York City this week.

“You can feel the urgency to harness this new ocean energy resource coming from states and businesses competing to be first movers,” AWEA chief executive Tom Kiernan told the conference.

The megawatts on offer are starting to add up, with offshore wind “poised to take off like a rocket in the US”, Innogy US offshore lead Chris Wissemann told reNEWS.

Maryland recently awarded 370MW, while Massachusetts issued a call for 800MW. New York will unveil details of a 2.4GW drive this year and in two weeks there will be an election in New Jersey, where the front-runner for governor is calling for 3.5GW.

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Revolution Wind project would be based in New Bedford

The Port of New Bedford would be the hub for a 24-turbine, 144-MW offshore wind project if Deepwater Wind wins a state bid early next year to supply renewable energy to Massachusetts utilities, the company announced Friday.

Deepwater Wind Vice President Matt Morrissey announced plans for the company’s Revolution Wind project during a press conference near the New Bedford Marine Commerce Terminal, which he said would be both the construction and operations hub for the project. Revolution Wind would provide enough power to supply more than 70,000 homes.

The bid will be submitted in response to a 2016 bill enacted to require public utilities to purchase power produced from renewable energy sources, including offshore wind.

Morrissey said that Revolution Wind would create 700 construction jobs and 60 permanent jobs to maintain and operate the wind farm, which would be built about 30 miles south of New Bedford in federal waters. It would create an economic impact of $200-$250 million, he said.

Morrissey said Deepwater Wind would pay Massachusetts $5.5 million annually during the one- to two-year construction phase to use the Marine Commerce Terminal, which was built by the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center at cost of $113 million. It is the only terminal in the nation built specifically to accommodate the great size and weight of offshore wind turbine components.

Deepwater Wind also will pay New Bedford $500,000 annually for harbor services and other related costs during construction.

Morrissey said Deepwater Wind also wants to help build a regional supply chain to help lower the cost of building offshore wind farms and the power they produce, noting that costs have fallen sharply in Europe over the past two years.

“This is a milestone moment,” he said. “It is just the beginning” as New England begins to replace aging, costly fossil fuel and nuclear power plants.

Morrissey credited New Bedford Mayor Jon Mitchell for providing the leadership and vision to help launch the new industry.

Mitchell noted that 25 percent of the nation’s harvestable wind resource is located along the region’s coastline and that offshore wind will bring jobs and economic growth to the city “10, 20 and 50 years from now.”

Mitchell said New Bedford has “the best seafaring workforce in the country — bar none” — a key advantage for New Bedford as competition emerges in other port cities along the East Coast.

Deepwater Wind built the nation’s first offshore wind farm — five turbines producing 30MW — on Block Island and has a lease to build another project off Long Island.

Deepwater Wind is one of three developers hoping to build the first industrial scale wind farm off the Massachusetts coast in waters leased to them by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management off Martha’s Vineyard. The other lease-holders are Bay State Wind, a subsidiary of DONG Energy (soon to be renamed Orsted), and Vineyard Wind.

Deepwater Wind’s Massachusetts Vice President Matt Morrissey announced the company’s intention to stage its Revolution Wind offshore wind project in the Port of New Bedford. With him, from left, are Port Director Ed Anthes-Washburn, Mayor Jon Mitchell and New Bedford City Councilor and Workforce Investment Board Director Jim Oliveira.

Offshore wind setting sail in North America

By Lance Marram, CEO
Senvion North America
For Windpower Engineering and Development

We are slowly beginning to consider harnessing the wind off of our coasts in North America by developing more offshore wind-power projects. To date, a small five-turbine wind farm and a handful of pilot projects have been developed in the U.S. The industry has been focused on setting standards, developing regulations, and auctioning offshore waters for potential development. While, in Europe, the offshore wind sector continues to grow and is successfully working on measures to reduce costs.

The industry standard for offshore turbines is a nominal capacity of 5 to 6 MW. In the near future, 10+ MW turbines are expected. While the United Kingdom, Denmark, and Germany are leading in offshore wind power, the U.S. is learning from such frontrunners. Most experts agree that in North America, the potential for offshore wind power means one thing: huge economic opportunities.

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Offshore wind industry in US with a dozen projects slated

From the New Bedford Wind Energy Center

State and federal officials meet in New Bedford Oct. 4 to discuss developments in offshore wind.

From Cape Cod to Cape Hatteras, the offshore wind industry is taking shape along the East Coast.
The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management has leased 12 projects (soon to be 13) covering 1.4 acres of ocean for a total of $68 million. The sites are capable of producing 16,000MW of electrical power.
Massachusetts is expected to award the first contract for developing a wind farm off the coast of Martha’s Vineyard by spring of 2018.
Studies of the effect of offshore wind farms on bird and bat migration and marine mammals are continuing.

The update was provided during a meeting on wind and renewable energy development before the New England Fisheries Management Council in New Bedford.

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From GreenTECH Media

When the U.S. was ready to ramp up its solar industry, developers benefited from investments made in Germany, Spain and elsewhere in Europe that had funded gigawatt-scale annual deployments and pushed down costs. The same could happen with offshore wind.

By the end of 2016, 14.4 gigawatts of offshore wind capacity had been installed globally, with nearly 90 percent of the total deployed in European waters. Prices for projects coming on-line from 2020 have fallen to $50 per megawatt-hour in Denmark, the Netherlands and Germany. The United States, meanwhile, has so far managed to bring on-line just one modest commercial project, the 30-megawatt Block Island Wind Farm off of Rhode Island.

A bill introduced this summer by a bipartisan group of senators aims to help the U.S. catch up with Europe. On August 1, 2017, Senators Tom Carper (D-Del.) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) introduced the Incentivizing Offshore Wind Power Act with 10 co-sponsors.

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Check out America’s first offshore wind installation vessel

From SouthCoastToday.com

A Texas company is building the nation’s first offshore wind-turbine installation vessel and designing it to fit through the New Bedford hurricane barrier. Today, we break down what it means to the industry.

What it is

Houston-based engineering company Zentech is converting an existing jack-up vessel to install offshore wind turbines. Jack-up barges have three or four legs that raise the vessel out of the ocean and create a stable platform for working. The oil and gas industry uses them routinely, but this will be the first U.S.-flagged ship capable of installing wind turbines. The company expects it to be ready by the end of 2018.

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Vineyard Wind crews will begin survey for cable sites

From the MV Times

The survey vessel Henry Hudson will be working out of Vineyard Haven Harbor for the next three weeks, part of an effort by Vineyard Wind to map potential routes for cabling from its proposed wind farm 15 miles off the southern coast of Martha’s Vineyard.

On Monday morning, officials from Vineyard Wind and its partner Vineyard Power, which represents about 5,000 Island customers, offered tours of the Henry Hudson to showcase not only the technology aboard the vessel, but the potential for the Vineyard to see some economic impact from wind farm projects.

Vineyard Wind is one of three companies looking to be the first to locate a wind farm off the coast of Massachusetts. The companies have to submit final bids by Dec. 20, and one of the companies will be selected to move ahead in April.

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